Apple Goes Green?

Campaign history:

10/03 Greenpeace contacts Apple for information on their chemicals policy.
02/04 Follow-up reminder on Greenpeace request to Apple.
04/04 Greenpeace Chemical Home database launched; Apple graded red on their chemical policy.
06/04 Samsung is the first major electronics company to commit to phasing out all BFRs and PVC.
08/04 First meeting between Greenpeace and Apple – no movement from Apple on chemicals policy.
11/04 Second meeting between Greenpeace and Apple – still no commitment from Apple on strengthening its chemical policy.
11/04 Nokia commits to phasing out all BFRs and PVC.
04/05 Sony and Sony Ericsson commit to phasing out all BFRs and PVC.
09/05 Third meeting between Greenpeace and Apple – still no change in Apple’s chemical policy. Greenpeace gives Apple advance notice that Greenpeace will be ranking it on their chemical policy as well as their waste policy in 2006.
09/05 LG Electronics commits to phasing out all BFRs and PVC.
03/06 HP commits to phase out BFRs and PVC.
04/06 Fourth meeting between Greenpeace and Apple called by Apple to update Greenpeace on obstacles to phasing out PVC and BFRs.
06/06 Dell commits to a plan to phase out a list of hazardous chemicals with priority on BFR and PVC by 2009. Dell also announces takeback scheme for any Dell product, in US from September 2006 and globally from November 2006.
06/06 Two calls between Greenpeace and Apple initiated by Apple to discuss Apple’s draft ranking on Guide to Greener Electronics. No policy change forth coming from Apple.
08/06 Guide to Greener Electronics launched: Apple gets 2.7/10 and finds itself fourth from the bottom of the ranking.
09/06 First analysis of an Apple laptop: Independant sampling revealed that MacBook Pro contained PVC and BFRs.
09/06 Green my Apple campaign launched. No official response from Apple to date.

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